Friday’s Faces from the Past

My father and grandmother in 1949, around May.  I’m pretty pleased with how this turned out.

Racie & Randy Morris--before

Racie Harris Morris & Randy–before

Racie & Randy Morris

Racie Harris Morris & Randy Morris–after

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1940 Census x 2

I was super excited, like most people, to see all of the 1940 census records.  I even worked to transcribe many for Family Search.  In looking for records for my grandparents this past week, I came back across the 1940 census for his family.  Or at least I thought I though I had come across it again.  Instead, I found a second census record for the Fred H. Morris family.

I’m not sure what to make of it.  At first, I thought someone had uploaded a second copy in error.  But as I looked at the record, the names are different.  Even my family has a variation!  For the most part, the information is the same.  I do wonder why my grandparents appear twice.

Fred Morris Family, 194 census, Sheet 2b

Fred Morris Family, 194 census, Sheet 2b

Fred Morris Family, 194 census, Sheet 4a

Fred Morris Family, 194 census, Sheet 4a

Two Ancestors Ago–Fred Hoyt Morris, Sr (52 Ancestors–Week 8)

The facts:

  • Fred Hoyt Morris Sr
  • Born:  June 14, 1907 in Montgomery County, NC
  • Parents:  Charlie “Braid” & Annie Cranford Morris
  • Married:  Racie Elmira Harris in Bennettsville, SC in September, 1928.
  • Died:  October 23, 1980
  • My Grandfather
    • I am descended through:
      • his son

morris, fMy Pa Pa was my everything until I was 7 years old.  Ma Ma always said he let me do whatever I wanted.  If that meant writing in books, I did.  There is still evidence of that.  We made forts on couches and fished and picked blackberries.  Well…he baited my hooks and watched me lose it or catch a catfish or suckerfish which he had no use for.  I have a feeling that fishing wasn’t quite what he usually enjoyed when I was along with him.  He never complained except for the one time he was trying to lay a new sidewalk at church and I demanded to go along with him.  I stubbed my toe and nearly took my nail off.  His initial response was worry and frustration and fussed that he told me I didn’t have any need to be there anyway.

 While my parents worked, I stayed with my daddy’s parents until I was four, and then I stayed after school.  Pa Pa would come pick me up early after he was done with his rounds and probably his sort of fishing.  He was my light and I never wanted to miss an opportunity to be with him, even if it meant trekking through the woods (he went in front to get rid of spider webs) or blackberry briers (usually I watched from the side).  I simply couldn’t get enough. 
 When I was seven, he had a heart attack and spent two weeks in our local hospital in ICU.  Even though the age limit was 12, I was able to go in and see my Pa Pa.  I didn’t quite understand why he couldn’t get up and go with me, or sit up and really play.   After two weeks, he was transferred to another hospital.  They were more strict there, but when my cousins took me for a walk, we went right by the wing he was in.  He got up out of bed and came to the window to see me.  I wanted to stay longer, but my cousin’s hurried us both along, saying PaPa needed his rest.  I don’t know how soon after he was gone.  My child’s memory says he was in both hospitals about two weeks each.  I know he was due to come home and had another, worse, heart attack.  This one, he couldn’t overcome.  He passed away on October 23, 1980.  I remember being upset that it was my mama’s birthday and how bad that was.
 Fred Hoyt Morris was born on June 14, 1907 in the Moratock community in Montgomery County, NC.  His parents were Charlie “Braid” and Annie Cranford Morris.  In 1930, he worked for the sawmill.  I have pictures (I’ll try to remember to add them) from 1932 when he went on a trip to Tennessee to sawmill for a bit.  By 1940, he was working as a carpenter in the Bridge Building industry.  He worked for the State of NC Highway Department for 30 years.  My daddy found his service pins the other day (one for 10, 15, 20, 25 and maybe one for 5), a few are shown here along with his lighter and a Methodist Men pin.  

2014-02-24_19-07-09_813 2014-02-24_19-03-24_331 2014-02-24_19-03-46_858 2014-02-24_19-04-28_850 2014-02-24_19-05-21_464 2014-02-24_19-06-49_392

  • Sources:
    • Personal Knowledge
    • Morris, Fred Hoyt 1910, 1920, 1930, 1940×2 US Federal Census